Monday, October 19, 2009

Dynamite Always Blows Down

It seems the government has a different way of dealing with risks when it's racing to save one of its own. For example, remember when the poor Falcon at VAFB had to pick up stakes and move to Kwaj? Heaven forbid, the poor little "commercial" fellow might have sprinkled debris on ascent over the rest of the base.

The distance from pad 39-A to 39-B is 8715 ft. We think you know what our next question would be.

8 comments:

Anonymous said...

Not to mention what is 64,000 feet to the south. Of course, I'm sure no one was thinking of cruising when the launch date got changed.

Anonymous said...

as rumsfeld would say, we have the ares we have, not the ares we want. or something

BenRG said...

Well, hopefully, if they do have to blow the thing, it will happen when it is close to max-Q and is safely over water. That way, nothing important (except several important current and ex Viceroys' egos) will be damaged.

~

Ben the Space Brit

mp_meijering said...

What is the blast radius of an unladen Ares I first stage?

Anonymous said...

Is NASA following the age old advice of 'If at first you don't succeed, destroy all evidence that you even tried'?

If Ares 1-x is thrown in the ocean then who can refute the claims of superior design and safety. The evidence will never see the light of day nor be available for independent review.

And those obviously rotten with guilt will get away with their misdeeds - again! Hubble, ISS, Ares, where will it end?

Chuck2200 said...

It's not going to blow up. It is a Shuttle 4-seg SRB that has flown scores of times before. It will fly very well this time as well. Unfortunately the impression it will make is that all is well in Ares-I land when nothing could be further from the truth. They should have left the launch date on Halloween.

Anonymous said...

what's surprising about the Corndog Junior is the number of problems in such a simple design. The Roll thrusters are marginally sized and most of the GNC electronics are not qualified for the environments.

That NASA looks likely to fail at this is truly amazing.

Rocket said...

Well, it worked. And the marginally sized roll control used less than 10% of it's propellant. However, there are many questions that need answered - that is what a demo or development flight is for.